Vote Affirms LGBT Clergy Called to Serve the Church

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Kendall Kelly Manifest Destiny

Sharon Groves of the HRCThe Human Rights Campaign (HRC) today applauded the decision of the Presbyterian Church (USA) to remove all barriers to the ordination of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people as ministers and lay leaders. Today, the Twin Cities Presbytery in Minneapolis, Minn. became the 87th presbytery (regional governing bodies) in the 2.4 million-member denominations to vote to allow LGBT clergy and lay people the right to serve openly as ministers.

“History was made today,” said Dr. Sharon Groves, director of HRC’s Religion and Faith Program.  “Presbyteries all around the country – from Alabama to Utah – voted to say no to prejudice and yes to those who are called to serve the church. Through this action, the Presbyterian Church (USA) removes one more roadblock in the way of justice.  Because of today’s decision, a young person is freer to claim his or her sexual orientation, gender identity and religion. This decision will have profound ramifications for people of all faiths everywhere.

Today’s decision is the result of a long process.  Three other times, a vote was taken in the Presbyterian General Assembly to open the doors to LGBT clergy, but did not reach the 51% ratification by regional presbyteries. Because of the hard and faithful work by organizations such as More Light Presbyterians, Covenant Network of Presbyterians, That All May Freely Serve, Presbyterian Welcome, and Presbyterian Voices for Justice, the Presbyterian Church (USA) can hold its head high today said the HRC.

 

Sharon Groves of the HRCThe Human Rights Campaign (HRC) today applauded the decision of the Presbyterian Church (USA) to remove all barriers to the ordination of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people as ministers and lay leaders. Today, the Twin Cities Presbytery in Minneapolis, Minn. became the 87th presbytery (regional governing bodies) in the 2.4 million-member denominations to vote to allow LGBT clergy and lay people the right to serve openly as ministers.