Torn: Rescuing the Gospel from the Gays- Vs.- Christians Debate

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Scott Patronick of PhillipsburgOn the morning of Feb. 27, Scott Patronick, 47, of Phillipsburg, N.J., was found severely beaten and taken to a local hospital where he died shortly after. Two men, also residents of Phillipsburg, were taken into custody and charged with the murder. Bail has been set at $1 million and both face up to 30 years in prison if convicted.

book review: 

Justin Lee, founder of the Gay Christian Network, tells a charming coming of age story in Torn: Rescuing the Gospel from the Gays vs. Christians Debate. He depicts the struggles of a boy looking for answers, acceptance, and above all, hope for negotiating his identities as both gay and Christian. Lee expresses a critical view on Christians’ and gays’ judgments and interactions, yet he is compassionate as he understands each groups’ claims and concerns.

Lee debunks common misconceptions about gays and tells readers that not every Christian holds anti-gay beliefs or acts negatively towards gay people. In the words of Justin Lee, “Torn is about the biggest controversy in the church today— the one issue most likely to tear the church apart and damage the gospel’s credibility in our culture.”

In response to this, Lee’s first book, Christianity Today says it is “disarmingly vulnerable… poignant…” and Publisher’s Weekly says, “Both LGBT individuals and Christians will benefit from the modeling of a kinder, more accommodating navigation of this culture war.” Since it’s publication, Lee has continued to advocate for peace between gays and Christians through his website, the Gay Christian Network.

More information on Torn can be found on Justin’s blog at http://gcnjustin.tumblr.com/book

 

book review: 

Justin Lee, founder of the Gay Christian Network, tells a charming coming of age story in Torn: Rescuing the Gospel from the Gays vs. Christians Debate. He depicts the struggles of a boy looking for answers, acceptance, and above all, hope for negotiating his identities as both gay and Christian. Lee expresses a critical view on Christians’ and gays’ judgments and interactions, yet he is compassionate as he understands each groups’ claims and concerns.