Tabatha Coffey is taking over on Bravo

418

Tabatha CoffeyTabatha Coffey is someone who does not let anyone or anything stand in her way. The beautician, educator, and star of Bravo’s hit series “Tabatha’s Salon Takeover,” as well as her ten year relationship with her partner (who has yet to be revealed) are a testament of her strong work ethic. All this, despite growing up as an obese child, being bullied, and loosing her mother to cancer. Tabatha has made a name of herself internationally, slimmed down, and is happy to call New Jersey her home for the past sixteen years. She revealed her strengths in a recent interview.

You have been working at your craft since you were a mere fourteen years old. What inspired you to want to become a part of the hair and beauty industry?

Tabatha CoffeyHonestly, growing up in my parents’ clubs I loved fitting the wigs to the drag queens’  heads and helping to transform them. I love makeup, I adore fashion, but hair is what I loved more than anything.

As an openly-gay beautician and entrepreneur, do you feel that you faced more challenges making a name for yourself within the industry?

No not at all. I don’t introduce myself as “Tabatha the Lesbian.” If people ask me questions about my orientation, I will discuss it, but I think my talent along with the amount of time I put into the industry is what makes me who I am. Not my sexuality.

You have been with your partner for over ten years now. What advice to do have for our readers in terms of managing both a career and a relationship?

It is extremely difficult. It comes down to a communal balance and a give and take of compromise. I am lucky to be with someone who is very supportive of me and what I do. She understands who I am, she comprehends my work ethic, and is content with the amount of time I have to devote to my work.

Gay men are often typecast as not being able to handle a long-term relationship. If same sex marriage were legalized do you feel that the community would, as a whole, take commitment more seriously?

I really do. We have all heard the joke, “one date is enough and they don’t want another one.” We should all be given the right to live freely with our partner, have children, and be able to own property together. There is promiscuity in the heterosexual world; the gay community doesn’t own the right. There are many gay couples that have lived successfully who are simply not put in the spotlight. I know many gay couples that have been together longer than I have been with my own partner.

What message would you like to relay specifically to teens and young adults who are confused and trying to come to terms with who they are?

I truly believe that coming out and coming to terms with our sexuality, although we get to the same result, we deal with it all differently. You have to be strong and understand that being gay or a lesbian doesn’t make you a freak; you do not deserve to be bullied, harassed, or deemed second best. The first step in achieving happiness is believing in yourself, which is difficult at first because people universally give you a hard time in the beginning, but once you move past that everything spirals upward.

Having grown up in Australia and traveled the world, what are your thoughts on the Garden State? Give us the good, the bad, and the ugly!

Moving to New Jersey was a shock; I came from living in a city (London) to a suburb and was viewed as a “freak.” Many people had a hard time with me when I moved here but I have lived here for sixteen years straight. I like the state and I feel we get a bad rap because people see the not-so-attractive parts a lot more than they see the beautiful areas. We are in close proximity of New York and can take advantage of what the city has to offer yet still come home to a spacious environment.

This season of your Bravo series, “Tabatha’s Salon Takeover,” seems to be a lot more emotional than your two previous seasons. How would you say your experience in season three is as opposed to the other two seasons?

Like most programs, I feel that we have evolved. When you own a business your life and your business become very much intertwined, and while these salons have had legitimate financial problems, they all stem from emotional issues their owners were dealing with.

What are some tips and advice you have for salon owners in terms of achieving success and maintaining it?

The first tip is maintaining education. You never stop learning. This is an industry that is always evolving, whether it be trends or products, this is an industry that changes incredibly fast. There is always a bigger or better style or product on the market, and you always have to be on top of it or you will get left behind. Secondly, one must not confuse an intimate relationship with a client with a friend. Just because a client opens up to you, does not give you reason to behave unprofessionally in front of them or to adhere to their needs less.

What are some hair styles and color concepts that we are going to be seeing on men and women this year?

The market is very celebrity driven right now. Clients are often coming in with photographs of how a celebrity wore their hair on the red carpet. I recommend a drastic change. For example, if you have had long hair sometimes it helps to cut it off or to dye your hair a dramatic color. This shows versatility and teaches us that hair can be played with.

Tabatha CoffeyTabatha Coffey is someone who does not let anyone or anything stand in her way. The beautician, educator, and star of Bravo’s hit series “Tabatha’s Salon Takeover,” as well as her ten year relationship with her partner (who has yet to be revealed) are a testament of her strong work ethic. All this, despite growing up as an obese child, being bullied, and loosing her mother to cancer. Tabatha has made a name of herself internationally, slimmed down, and is happy to call New Jersey her home for the past sixteen years. She revealed her strengths in a recent interview.