More suburban towns and cities are welcoming to gay families

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Gregory_G_Allen

Gregory G Allencommentary.

Mr. Rogers wanted us all to be his neighbor when we were growing up, and for the LGBT community more and more areas are becoming just as welcoming. In past decades, gay men and lesbian women would flock to larger cities to find comfort in surrounding themselves with kindred spirits. But times have changed and the need to segregate isn’t as necessary.

There are many towns right in New Jersey that offer the open arms of diversity when it comes to finding a place to settle down and make a home. Montclair, Maplewood, Plainfield, and Asbury Park all jump to people’s minds, but the truth is there are several cities in New Jersey that have openly gay and lesbian Jerseyans productively working, living, and aiding to the growth of the community.

Nowadays people want to live where they want to live. And homosexuals can be the professors, lawyers, doctors, dentist, and city or state officials right in your town. With decisions being made in state senate offices about equality, perhaps society is finally beginning to realize sexuality is not what defines a particular group. A neighbor can be a home with two mothers or an African-American woman married to a German-Italian man. The connections we make with those that live on our block are about our common interest, where our children attend school, or the mutual organizations we may belong to and not based on what we perceive as being different.

So those in the gay community should not be afraid to leave New York City and venture out past Hoboken and Jersey City when looking for comfortable communities to call home in New Jersey. Give Clifton, Hawthorne, or Wayne a try. Or even a neighboring county such as Bergen or Essex. Throw out the fear of yesterday of the suburbs, put on a sweater and sneakers and make Mr. Rogers proud that we’ve opened up those coat closets in the outskirts of major cities to build a home for our LGBT families.

This commentary was originally posted at Examiner.com.

Gregory_G_AllenAuthor Gregory G. Allen quotes Abraham Lincoln – “In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.” (This is my favorite quote and says so much about me. I’ve spent my life in some form of the creative arts – filling my life with what makes me most happy.)

Visit Mr. Allen at http://www.ggallen.net/#/home

Gregory G Allencommentary.

Mr. Rogers wanted us all to be his neighbor when we were growing up, and for the LGBT community more and more areas are becoming just as welcoming. In past decades, gay men and lesbian women would flock to larger cities to find comfort in surrounding themselves with kindred spirits. But times have changed and the need to segregate isn’t as necessary.