A primer to being helpful: Tips for the aspiring “good witch”

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Rainbow triangle

Out of the Broom Closet. 

As we all draw to the end of another calendar year, I would like to thank all the readers. Comments are always appreciated (though I find it odd that in our age of advanced electronic communication, most reactions are passed along in the oldest fashioned of ways, face-to-face). However, if you choose to respond silently, that’s fine, too.

Rather than discussing how so many of our year-end customs have pre-Christian roots, I thought I would pass along some words of advice about all things magical; none of these embody hard and fast rules, but I hope they might assist you in being more mindful in all you do in the coming year.
In no particular order:

Winter Snow scene photo by Leon Calafiore

At some point, you are either going to dive right in and attempt to work some spells, or realize that you have a certain empathy or talent for working magic and want to build on your proficiency. Like most things in life, the thrill of achievement will lead to a need to share with others the particulars of your achievements. In the case of being a practicing Magician, this can lead to a number of reactions, from scorn (which can be amusing) to a request for you to lend a hand (often from the same person).

Only you can decide what sort of assistance you wish to extend to others in your life, and how often. Like being known as a big lottery winner, such an announcement will provoke some folks to put the touch on you way too often. Magic and you can certainly improve a situation, but it can’t fix a life, particularly when the individual is the sort that conserves his or her strength by using up everyone else’s.

Despite this fact, you may, like all other sorts of goodhearted people, be of the opinion that you can somehow “make it all better” for someone else, and when the expected results don’t happen (that life is still the same ridiculous, dysfunctional mess) the fault is somehow yours. I’m here to tell you that this is assuredly not the case. There are folks in the world that actually prefer to wallow in misery and cling to it, as it makes them appear as sympathetic. Their need is bottomless, incapable of satisfaction, and they will drag you down with them. For some personalities, that’s actually their goal.

While some magical activities may leaving you feeling a bit exhausted, they should also leave you feeling whole, being a combination of will, knowledge and practice. If you find you are completely wiped out, you need to rethink your approach, and please, please cut off any contact with the person or group before they suck you dry.

When attempting a working of any sort, measure twice, cut once: excellent advice for things made by hand, even better for things made by magic. Review what you are planning a few times; make sure you have all the necessary elements at hand. Don’t start until it all makes sense.

Have patience: just because you wanted tangible results to manifest, that doesn’t mean that magical time will conform to chronological time, or your own internal reckoning of either.

Different types of spells have different trajectories: some have more subtle results than others. Don’t expect a spectacle when a personal appearance will serve.

Change the timing: this requires more calculation on your part. While the spell may work best on a Tuesday, it might not work if the planets are in a conflicting pattern on that Tuesday.

Change your intent: the corollary to the admonition “Be careful what you wish for.” If your goal is to win millions of dollars when an unexpected windfall of hundreds would suffice, check yourself.

Magic is a supplement to, not a substitute for: healthcare, personal hygiene and relationships.

Sometimes, no effect is just what happens. Learn from it, and learn to live with it.

Bright blessings to all !

Leon CalifioreLeon Calafiore, a lifelong Wiccan and teacher of occult arts, is Past Master of a New York Masonic Lodge known for the perfection of its ritual. Leon also conducts occult research.

Out Of the Broom Closet photo December 2012 by Leon Calafiore.Out of the Broom Closet. 

As we all draw to the end of another calendar year, I would like to thank all the readers. Comments are always appreciated (though I find it odd that in our age of advanced electronic communication, most reactions are passed along in the oldest fashioned of ways, face-to-face). However, if you choose to respond silently, that’s fine, too.