“God’s Own Country” will stick with you

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"God's Own Country" on DVD
God’s Own Country review

Let’s face it; gay media isn’t always something to write home about. Often campy, dramatic, laden with gratuitous nudity, and a weak story line, it’s rare that an LGBT film is impactful. Most times it may feel like one is watching soft-core pornography or spending the greater portion of the day at a gay club.

But. We continue watching, and waiting for films to not only entertain us, but also change us. To truly encapsulate and represent our culture without risking a portrayal of excessive drug abuse, random hookups, sexual deviancy, hours of parties, and so on. That said, it’s been a good year for gay filmmaking, with movies like Call Me By Your Name and Love, Simon helping mainstream the LGBT community and bring our culture into the fold – tastefully, artistically, meaningfully.

God’s Own Country is one of these movies. Directed by Francis Lee, starring Josh O’Conner and Alec Secareanu, the story takes place in Yorkshire at a tired farm. Johnny (O’Conner) is solely responsible for the success of the farm, his father having previously suffered a stroke. The stress of the day-to-day drives Johnny to drink and pursue superficial sexual encounters.

He struggles with his sexual identity in a small village. But, one evening, he finds a Romanian migrant hiring him to help with the farm. The journey of the two men is one of self-discovery, and pursuit of an authentic love for one another.

Director Francis Lee shapes each scene like an artist

With beautiful scenery, tasteful intimacy, and a storyline that is fluid and captivating, God’s Own Country is filled with relatable emotion. Lee shapes each scene like an artist. He offers dynamic images of addiction’s impact on others, the strength one might experience in a sincere relationship, and the mending together of a broken family.

This film will stick with you. Its impact is significant, and this viewer gives God’s Own Country his highest rating.

Trailer on YouTube.

godsowncountry.film/